Quality Kawasaki Motorcycle & Scooter Servicing in London

With years worth of combined experience at London Motorcycles there isn’t anything that our fully trained technitions have not seen before from minor faults to major disasters – we’ve have it all covered.

Kawasaki Servicing with London Motorcycles

We offer some great packages for your Kawasaki Motorcycle & Scooter services starting at £90 (plus VAT), based on your model and requirements.

These great service packages includes:

  • Oil – Replace (4 stroke only)
  • Oil Filter Replace (4 stroke only)
  • Oil – Top Up (2 stroke only)
  • Spark Plug Replace
  • Brake Pads Check
  • Brake Fluid Check
  • Air Filter Check/Clean
  • Suspension Check
  • Gear Oil Check
  • Throttle Freeplay Check & Adjustment
  • Carb Mixture Check
  • Idle Speed Check & Adjustment
  • Electrics Check (lights, horn etc)
  • Battery Check
  • Tyre Pressure Check
  • Tyre Condition Check
  • Transmission: Rollers Check, V-Belt Check
  • Oil Pump Check/Adjust (2 stroke only)

Making a booking

If you would like to book your Motorcycle or Scooter into the London Motorcycles Workshop, please get in contact with us or alternatively you can make your booking online.

Book Online

 

The History of Kawasaki

Kawasaki motorcycles are manufactured by the Motorcycle & Engine division of Kawasaki Heavy Industries at plants in Japan, USA, Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand.

Kawasaki Aircraft initially manufactured motorcycles under the Meguro name, having bought an ailing motorcycle manufacturer, Meguro Manufacturing with whom they had been in partnership. Later formed Kawasaki Motor Sales. Some early motorcycles display an emblem with “Kawasaki Aircraft” on the fuel tank.

During 1962, Kawasaki engineers were developing a four-stroke engine for small cars which ended in 1962 when some of the engineers transferred to the Meguro factory to work on the Meguro K1 and the SG, a single cylinder 250 cc OHV. In 1963, Kawasaki and Meguro merged to form Kawasaki Motorcycle Co.,Ltd. Kawasaki motorcycles from 1962 through 1967 used an emblem which can be described as a flag within a wing.

Work continued on the Meguro K1, a copy of the BSA A7 500 cc vertical twin and on the Kawasaki W1. The K2 was exported to the U.S. for a test in response to the expanding American market for four-stroke motorcycles in which case it was rejected for a lack of power but by the mid-1960s, Kawasaki was finally exporting a moderate number of motorcycles. The Kawasaki H1 Mach III in 1968, along with several enduro-styled motorcycles to compete with Yamaha, Suzuki and Honda, increased sales of Kawasaki units.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_motorcycles